Sommerhitze & Powershell 3 kleine Tipps

Hallo Netways Follower,

Ich melde mich dies mal mit einem kurzen aber meist vergessenen Thema nämlich wie kriegt man unter Windows diese vermaledeiten Powershell Skripts korrekt zum laufen.

Wenn man bei einem normalen Icinga2 Windows Agenten diese in ‘Betrieb’ nehmen will benötigt es etwas Handarbeit und Schweiß bei diesen Sommertagen um dies zu bewerkstelligen.

Trotzdem hier ein paar Tipps:

1) Tipp “Powershell Skripte sollten ausführbar sein”

Nachdem der Windows Agent installiert und funktional ist sollte man sich auf der Windows Maschine wo man das Powershell Skript ausführen möchte in die Powershell (nicht vergessen mit Administrativer Berechtigung) begeben.

Um Powershell Skripts ausführen zu können muss dies erst aktiviert werden dazu gibt es das folgende Kommando

Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted
Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned
Set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted

Hier sollte zumeist RemoteSigned ausreichend sein, aber es kommt wie immer auf den Anwendungsfall an. More Info here.

Nach der Aktivierung kann man nun überprüfen ob man Powershell Skripts ausführen kann.
Hierzu verwende ich meist das Notepad um folgendes zu schreiben um anschließend zu prüfen ob das oben aktivierte auch klappt.

Also ein leeres Windows Notepad mit dem folgenden befüllen:

Write-Host "Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatul, ash nazg thrakatulûk agh burzum-ishi krimpatul. "

Das ganze dann als ‘test.ps1’ speichern.

Nun wieder in die Powershell zurück und an dem Platz wo man das Powershell Skript gespeichert hat es mit dem folgenden Kommando aufrufen.
PS C:\Users\dave\Desktop> & .\test.ps1
Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatul, ash nazg thrakatulûk agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.

Sollte als Ergebnis angezeigt werden damit Powershell Skripts ausführbar sind.

2) Tipp “Das Icinga2 Agent Plugin Verzeichnis”

In der Windows Version unseres Icinga2 Agents ist das standard Plugin Verzeichnis folgendes:
PS C:\Program Files\ICINGA2\sbin>

Hier liegen auch die Windows Check Executables.. und ‘.ps1’ Skripte welche auf dem Host ausgeführt werden sollten/müssen auch hier liegen.

3) Tipp “Powershell 32Bit & 64Bit”

Wenn ein Skript relevante 64Bit Sachen erledigen muss kann auch die 64er Version explizit verwendet werden in den Check aufrufen.

Das heißt wenn man den object CheckCommand “Mein Toller Check” definiert kann man in dem Setting:

command = [ "C:\\Windows\\sysnative\\WindowsPowerShell\\v1.0\\powershell.exe" ] //als 64 Bit angeben und
command = [ "C:\\Windows\\system32\\WindowsPowerShell\\v1.0\\powershell.exe" ] // als 32Bit.

Hoffe die drei kleinen Tipps erleichtern das Windows Monitoring mit Powershell Skripts.
Wenn hierzu noch Fragen aufkommen kann ich unser Community Forum empfehlen und den ‘kleinen’ Guide von unserem Kollegen Michael. Icinga Community Forums

Ich sag Ciao bis zum nächsten Mal.

David Okon
David Okon
Senior Consultant

Weltenbummler David hat aus Berlin fast den direkten Weg zu uns nach Nürnberg genommen. Bevor er hier anheuerte, gab es einen kleinen Schlenker nach Irland, England, Frankreich und in die Niederlande. Alles nur, damit er sein Know How als IHK Geprüfter DOSenöffner so sehr vertiefen konnte, dass er vom Apple Consultant den Sprung in unser Professional Services-Team wagen konnte. Er ist stolzer Papa eines Sohnemanns und bei uns mit der Mission unterwegs, unsere Kunden zu...

Speak up at DevOpsDays Berlin!

DevOpsDays are back to Berlin! And we at NETWAYS are happy to support it!

DevOpsDays Berlin cover topics of working together, software development, IT infrastructure operations, and the intersection between them. Call for Papers runs until July 31.

  • Have a great tale to tell about spreading DevOps to the rest of your company? We would like to hear that.
  • You live in or around Berlin and work in DevOps? We are very interested in the challenges and successes being experienced in our local area.
  • We want to hear all voices, including those that may speak less frequently at similar events. Speak up!

Submit your proposal and become a speaker at DevOpsDays Berlin:  www.papercall.io/2019-berlin.

DevOpsDays feature a combination of curated talks, ignites and self organized Open Space content. There will also be some technical hands-on workshops.
The event will take place November 27 – 28, 2019 at Kalkscheune Berlin.

Get your Tickets here.

Julia Hornung
Julia Hornung
Marketing Manager

Julia ist seit Juni 2018 Mitglied der NETWAYS Family. Vor ihrer Zeit in unserem Marketing Team hat sie als Journalistin und in der freien Theaterszene gearbeitet. Ihre Leidenschaft gilt gutem Storytelling, klarer Sprache und ausgefeilten Texten. Privat widmet sie sich dem Klettern und ihrer Ausbildung zur Yogalehrerin.

You missed out OSDC? — Sign up for OSCamp!

Hey folks!

The OSDC 2019 is in full swing! You didn’t get to be part of the happy DevOps crowd meeting in Berlin?

Here‘s your chance to find some relief by participating in the next big Open Source thing happening in Berlin this week: Be part of our OSCamp on Ansible!

But you gotta be really fast to grab one of the few remaining seats at opensourcecamp.de

To get a glimpse of how it feels to be one of the OSDC guys, just take a look at the photos published so far on our Twitter channel. And start getting excited what’s coming up at the OSCamp…

See you in Berlin on Thursday!

Pamela Drescher
Pamela Drescher
Head of Marketing

Pamela hat im Dezember 2015 das Marketing bei NETWAYS übernommen. Sie ist für die Corporate Identity unserer Veranstaltungen sowie von NETWAYS insgesamt verantwortlich. Die enge Zusammenarbeit mit Events ergibt sich aus dem Umstand heraus, dass sie vor ein paar Jahren mit Markus zusammen die Eventsabteilung geleitet hat und diese äußerst vorzügliche Zusammenarbeit nun auch die Bereiche Events und Marketing noch enger verknüpft. Privat ist sie Anführerin einer vier Mitglieder starken Katzenhorde, was ihr den absolut...
OSDC 2019: Buzzwo…erm…DevOps, Agile & YAML programmers

OSDC 2019: Buzzwo…erm…DevOps, Agile & YAML programmers

Cheers from Berlin, Moabit, 11th round for OSDC keeping you in the loop with everything with and around DevOps, Kubernetes, log event management, config management, … and obviously magnificent food and enjoyable get-together.

 

Goooood mooooorning, Berlin!

DevOps neither is the question, nor the answer … Arnold Bechtoldt from inovex kicked off OSDC with a provocative talk title. After diving through several problems and scenarios in common environments, we learned to fail often and fail hard, and improve upon. DevOps really is a culture, and not a job title. Also funny – the CV driven development, or when you propose a tool to prepare for the next job 🙂 One key thing I’ve learned – everyone gets the SAME permissions, which is kind of hard with the learned admin philosophy. Well, and obviously we are YAML programmers now … wait … oh, that’s truly inspired by Mr. Buytaert, isn’t it? 😉

Next up, Nicolas Frankel took us on a journey into logs and scaling at Exoscale. Being not the only developer in the room, he showed off that debug logging with computed results actually eats a lot of resources. Passing the handles/pointers to lazy log function is key here, that reminds me of rewriting the logging backend for Icinga 2 😉 Digging deeper, he showed a UML diagram with the log flow – filebeat collects logs, logstash parses the logs into JSON and Elasticsearch stores that. If you want to go fast, you don’t care about the schema and let ES do the work. Running a query then will be slow, not really matching the best index then – lesson learned. To conclude with, we’ve learned that filebeat actually can parse the log events into JSON already, so if you don’t need advanced filtering, remove Logstash from your log event stream for better performance.

Right before the magnificent lunch, Dan Barker being a chief architect at RSA Security for the Archer platform shared stories from normal production environments to actually following the DevOps spirit. Or, to avoid these hard buzzwords, just like “agile”, and to quote “A former colleague told me: ‘I’ve now understood agile – it’s like waterfall but with shorter steps.'”. He’s also told about important things – you’re not alone, praise your team members publicly.

 

Something new at OSDC: Ignites

Ignite time after lunch – Werner Fischer challenged himself with a few seconds per slide explaining microcode debugging to the audience, while Time Meusel shared their awesome work within the Puppet community with logs of automation involved (modulesync, etc) at Voxpupuli. Dan Barker really talked fast about monitoring best practices, whereas one shouldn’t put metrics into log aggregation tools and use real business metrics.

 

The new hot shit

Demo time – James “purpleidea” Shubin showed the latest developments on mgmt configuration, including the DSL similar to Puppet. Seeing the realtime changes and detecting combined with dynamic processing of e.g. setting the CPU counts really looks promising. Also the sound exaggeration tests with the audience where just awesome. James not only needs hackers, docs writers, testers, but also sponsors for more awesome resource types and data collectors (similar to Puppet facts).

Our Achim “AL” Ledermüller shared the war stories on our storage system, ranging from commercial netApp to GlusterFS (“no one uses that in production”) up until the final destination with Ceph. Addictive story with Tim mimicking the customer asking why the clusterfuck happened again 😉

Kedar Bidarkar from Red Hat told us more about KubeVirt which extends the custom resource definitions available from k8s with the VM type. There are several components involved: operator, api, handler, launcher in order to actually run a virtual machine. If I understand that correctly, this combines Kubernetes and Libvirt to launch real VMs instead of containers – sounds interesting and complicated in the same sentence.

Kubernetes operators the easy way – Matt Jarvis from Mesosphere introduced Kudo today. Creating native Kubernetes operators can become really complex, as you need to know a lot about the internals of k8s. Kudo aims to simplify creating such operators with a universal declarative operator configured via YAML.

 

Oh, they have food too!

The many coffee breaks with delicious Käsekuchen (or: Kaiser Torte ;)) also invite to visit our sponsor booths too. Keep an eye on the peeps from Thomas-Krenn AG, they have #drageekeksi from Austria with them. We’re now off for the evening event at the Spree river, chatting about the things learnt thus far with a G&T or a beer 🙂

PS: Follow the #osdc stream and NetwaysEvents on Twitter for more, and join us next year!

Michael Friedrich
Michael Friedrich
Senior Developer

Michael ist seit vielen Jahren Icinga-Entwickler und hat sich Ende 2012 in das Abenteuer NETWAYS gewagt. Ein Umzug von Wien nach Nürnberg mit der Vorliebe, österreichische Köstlichkeiten zu importieren - so mancher Kollege verzweifelt an den süchtig machenden Dragee-Keksi und der Linzer Torte. Oder schlicht am österreichischen Dialekt der gerne mit Thomas im Büro intensiviert wird ("Jo eh."). Wenn sich Michael mal nicht in der Community helfend meldet, arbeitet er am nächsten LEGO-Projekt oder geniesst...

Count Down for OSDC 2019

Only two more weeks to go until OSDC 2019! Your guide to happiness:

Mark the date. Grab your ticket. And start with getting excited!

To be fully prepared, here is your OSDC to do list:

  1. Grab your conference ticket – hurry, it’s already the last tickets call!
  2. Check out the conference agenda and create your very own conference program.
  3. Sign up for our “2019 Extra”: the free workshop on May 13 with James Shubin.
  4. See what we have planned for this year’s Dinner & Drinks event – Just this much: it’s getting wet …
  5. For the ultimate OSDC mood: take a glance at last year’s photos and start dreaming.

Well, there’s a lot for you to do – you better start right away! See you in Berlin!

Pamela Drescher
Pamela Drescher
Head of Marketing

Pamela hat im Dezember 2015 das Marketing bei NETWAYS übernommen. Sie ist für die Corporate Identity unserer Veranstaltungen sowie von NETWAYS insgesamt verantwortlich. Die enge Zusammenarbeit mit Events ergibt sich aus dem Umstand heraus, dass sie vor ein paar Jahren mit Markus zusammen die Eventsabteilung geleitet hat und diese äußerst vorzügliche Zusammenarbeit nun auch die Bereiche Events und Marketing noch enger verknüpft. Privat ist sie Anführerin einer vier Mitglieder starken Katzenhorde, was ihr den absolut...

Ansible can talk to your favorite API

Ansible is a powerful opensource config management and deployment tool, which can manage nearly any situtation. In many “DevOp” scenarios we come across multiple platforms, which we need to combine. Mostly applications provide an REST Api or web connectors to manage resources, jobs and deployments within the product.
Ansible provides various modules which can execute commands at specific APIs, such as the vmware-guest-module to create virtual machines or the jenkins-job-module to manage jobs over the Jenkins API.
In cases where no module is available, we can use the module “uri”.

The module takes several parameters, of which the “url” is the only required one. For this example I picked an example online API “http://dummy.restapiexample.com/”.
To get a list of all employees we use the method GET on http://dummy.restapiexample.com/api/v1/employees, the header Accept: application/json and register the content.


- name: Make requests to example api
  hosts: localhost
  connection: local
  tasks:
    - name: list employees
      uri:
        method: GET
        url: "http://dummy.restapiexample.com/api/v1/employees"
        return_content: yes
        headers:
          Accept: application/json
      register: response

    - debug:
        msg: "{{ response.content }}"

# Result
TASK [list employees] *************************************************************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK [debug] **********************************************************************************
ok: [localhost] => {
    "msg": [
        {
            "employee_age": "23",
            "employee_name": "test",
            "employee_salary": "46000",
            "id": "12008",
            "profile_image": ""
        }
    ]
}

Now we create a new user in our application, for this we talk to a different url http://dummy.restapiexample.com/api/v1/create and send a body with our user to create.
When the api accepts JSON I use a little trick to generate a valid json body out of yaml variables with the Ansible filter to_json

For this we create a variable with the same key value structure as the API expects it, in this case the structure looks like this {“name”:”test”,”salary”:”123″,”age”:”23″}.


- name: Make requests to example api
  hosts: localhost
  connection: local
  vars:
    data:
      chris:
        name: chris
        salary: 46000
        age: 27
      jessy:
        name: jessy
        salary: 70000
        age: 30
  tasks:
    - name: create employee
      uri:
        method: POST
        url: "http://dummy.restapiexample.com/api/v1/create"
        return_content: yes
        headers:
          Accept: application/json
        body_format: json
        body: "{{ item.value | to_json }}" //Render valid json from each dictionary in the variable data.
      with_dict: "{{ data }}"
      register: post_content

    - debug:
        msg: "{{ item.content }}"
      with_items: "{{ post_content.results }}"

# Result
ansible-playbook create_user.yaml

PLAY [Make requests to example api] ********************************************************************

TASK [Gathering Facts] *********************************************************************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK [create employee] *********************************************************************************
ok: [localhost] => (item={'value': {u'salary': 46000, u'age': 27, u'name': u'chris'}, 'key': u'chris'})
ok: [localhost] => (item={'value': {u'salary': 70000, u'age': 30, u'name': u'jessy'}, 'key': u'jessy'})

With this information given, you can now explore your own favorite API and hopefully reduce your daily tasks as simple Ansible playbooks.

Check out our Blog for more awesome posts and if you need help with Ansible send us a message!

Thilo Wening
Thilo Wening
Senior Consultant

Thilo hat bei NETWAYS mit der Ausbildung zum Fachinformatiker, Schwerpunkt Systemadministration begonnen und unterstützt nun nach erfolgreich bestandener Prüfung tatkräftig die Kollegen im Consulting. In seiner Freizeit ist er athletisch in der Senkrechten unterwegs und stählt seine Muskeln beim Bouldern. Als richtiger Profi macht er das natürlich am liebsten in der Natur und geht nur noch in Ausnahmefällen in die Kletterhalle.