Evolution of a Microservice-Infrastructure by Jan Martens | OSDC 2019

This entry is part 1 of 6 in the series OSDC 2019 | Recap

 

At the Open Source Data Center Conference (OSDC) 2019 in Berlin, Jan Martens invited to audience to travel with him in his talk „Evolution of a Microservice-Infrastructure”. You have missed him speaking? We got something for you: See the video of Jan‘s presentation and read a summary (below).

The former OSDC will be held for the first time in 2020 under the new name stackconf. With the changes in modern IT in recent years, the focus of the conference has increasingly shifted from a mainly static infrastructure approach to a broader spectrum that includes agile methods, continuous integration, container, hybrid and cloud solutions. This development is taken into account by changing the name of the conference and opening the topic area for further innovations.

Due to concerns around the coronavirus (COVID-19), the decision was made to hold stackconf 2020 as an online conference. The online event will now take place from June 16 to 18, 2020. Join us, live online! Save your ticket now at: stackconf.eu/ticket/


 

Evolution of a Microservice-Infrastructure

Jan Martens signed up with a talk titled “Evolution of a Microservice Infrastructure” and why should I summarize his talk if he had done that himself perfectly: “This talk is about our journey from Ngnix & Docker Swarm to Traefik & Nomad.”

But before we start getting more in depth with this talk, there is one more thing to know about it. This is more or less a sequel to “From Monolith to Microservices” by Paul Puschmann a colleague of Jan Martens, but it’s not absolutely necessary to watch them in order or both.

 

So there will be a bunch of questions answered by Jan during the talk, regarding their environment, like: “How do we do deployments? How do we do request routing? What problems did we encounter, during our infrastructural growth and how did we address them?”

After giving some quick insight in the scale he has to deal with, that being 345.000 employees and 15.000 shops, he goes on with the history of their infrastructure.

Jan works at REWE Digital, which is responsible for the infrastructure around services, like delivery of groceries. They started off with the takeover of an existing monolithic infrastructure, not very attractive huh? They confronted themselves with the question: “How can we scale this delivery service?” and the solution they came up with was a micro service environment. Important to point out here, would be the use of Docker/Swarm for the deployment of micro services.

Let’s skip ahead a bit and take a look at the state of 2018 REWE Digital. Well there operating custom Docker-Environment consists of: Docker, Consul, Elastic Stack, ngnix, dnsmasq and debian

Jan goes into explaining his infrastructure more and more and how the different applications work with each other, but let’s just say: Everything was fine and peaceful until the size of the environment grew to a certain point. And at that point problems with nginx were starting to surface, like requests which never reached their destination or keepalive connections, which dropped after a short time. The reason? Consul-template would reload all ngnix instances at the same time. The solution? Well they looked for a different reverse proxy, which is able to reload configuration dynamically and best case that new reverse proxy is even able to be configured dynamically.

The three being deemed fitting for that job were envoy, Fabio and traefik, but I have already spoiled their decision, its treafik. The points Jan mentioned, which had them decide on traefik were that it is dynamically configurable and is able to reload configuration live. That’s obviously not all, lots of metrics, a web ui, which was deemed nice by Jan and a single go binary, might have made the difference.

Jan drops a few words on how migration is done and then invests some time in talking about the benefits of traefik, well the most important benefit for us to know is, that the issues that existed with ngnix are gone now.

Well now that the environment was changed, there were also changes coming for swarm, acting on its own. The problems Jan addresses are a poor container spread, no self-healing, and more. You should be able to see where this is going. Well the candidates besides Docker Swarm are Rancher, Kubernetes and Nomad. Well, this one was spoiled by me as well.

The reasons to use nomad in this infrastructure might be pretty obvious, but I will list them anyway. Firstly, seamless consul integration, well both are by HashiCorp, who would have guessed. Nomad is able to selfheal and comes in a single go binary, just like traefik. Jan also claims it has a nice web UI, we have to take his word on that one.

Jan goes into the benefits of using Nomad, just like he went into the benefits of ngnix and shows how their work processes have changed with the change of their environment.

This post doesn’t give enough credit to how much information Jan has shared during his talk. Maybe roughly twenty percent of his talk are covered here. You should definitely check it out the full video to catch all the deeper more insightful topics about the infrastructure and how the applications work with each other.

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.

Fast log management for your infrastructure by Nicolas Frankel | OSDC 2019

This entry is part 3 of 6 in the series OSDC 2019 | Recap

 

Nicolas Frankel is a Developer Advocate with 15+ years experience consulting for many different customers, in a wide range of contexts. “Fast log management for your infrastructure” was his topic at the Open Source Data Center Conference (OSDC) 2019 in Berlin. Those who missed the talk back then now have the opportunity to see the video of Nicolas’ presentation and read a summary (below).

The former OSDC will be held for the first time in 2020 under the new name stackconf. With the changes in modern IT in recent years, the focus of the conference has increasingly shifted from a mainly static infrastructure approach to a broader spectrum that includes agile methods, continuous integration, container, hybrid and cloud solutions. This development is taken into account by changing the name of the conference and opening the topic area for further innovations.

We are proud to announce that Nicolas Frankel is in our speaker lineup this year, too. We are looking forward to his talk: “Real Continuous Deployment of JVM applications”.

Due to concerns around the coronavirus (COVID-19), the decision was made to hold stackconf 2020 as an online conference. The online event will now take place June 16 – 18, 2020. Be there, live online! Save your ticket now at: stackconf.eu/ticket/


Fast log management for your infrastructure

Fast log management for your infrastructure”, well that is one way to get OSDC visitors excited. Nicolas Frankel signed up with that one and he did not disappoint. The issues, he was tackling, were issues produced by optimization, that being said do you think about the logs when it comes to migrating your application to reactive micro services?

Before we get to all that, Nicolas had to take a little detour through programming logic and how logging works, and he also points out some misconceptions of how things are done and how they work. Like for example, his so called “[…] root of all evil”.

LOGGER.debug(
"Cart price is now {}", cart.getPrice())

He states the question, who believes that in case of the log level being above debug the statements will be ignored? That’s what is to be expected, however it is not the case. In a small demo section he gives further insight on the topic from the perspective of a software developer.

From the developer point of view one should only do physical logging is the statement he ends his demo explanation run on. Directly afterwards he states that developers do not like to think that they are dealing with the physical world, then he goes further on about the respective storage possibilities like the write time regarding SSDs, HDDs or on an NFS, which should be taken into account.

Tackled some issues already, Nicolas keeps switching back and forth between the perspective of a software developer and an operator. He puts a lot of empathizes on these perspective changes to make sure that everyone involved starts to understand where the issue lies and if there is an issue at all.

For example the writing process and the opening and closing of streams for single log statements. It would be great if the stream could be continuously open and log statements can be written until the stream can be closed. But arguably and in most cases by default, logging is blocking. While most frameworks allow asynchronous logging, there is no right or wrong. And it also doesn’t have to be a software development mistake nor a bad infrastructure.

He dives deeper into asynchronous logging, because if you want to use it, you have to understand it: from queue size to discarding thresholds, the difference between blocking and dropping messages, everything. Nicolas also covers some logging basics, like metadata and what is especially important. Most essential metadata named timestamp, log level, line number and more. You may ask, why? Because some metadata is more expensive to get than others.

After some more detours through log aggregations and common pitfalls, with searching in logs or mandatory metadata, we get to a well-known application stack in the world of logging, the Elastic Stack.

He explains the basic architecture of the Elastic Stack and how the applications work with each other. Especially Filebeat and Logstash take the spotlight during this part. Step by step he works his way through an abstraction of the path a log takes from Filebeat to Logstash until you get a JSON you are familiar with. Then common misunderstandings like “Why do I need Logstash at all?” are being tackled by him, before he goes onto how he is doing logging at Exoscale.

They are using syslog-ng instead of Filebeat, basically just because when they started Filebeat was not ready for production. Then a regular Logstash and before we come to Elasticsearch there is a Kafka running. The reason why they are using Kafka is that Kafka being a decentralized data store, and using Logstash to get data out of it there is lower risk of dropping data instead of buffering towards elasticsearch, because there are not multiple nodes writing at once.

Nicolas summarizes his talk at the end with six short statements or maybe even lessons for log management. If you want, head over to the video above to learn about them from Nicolas himself or experience him live to learn from him.

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.

Was war, ist und wird sein – ein Azubi & PowerShell

Wir Azubis bei NETWAYS lassen ohnehin oft genug durchscheinen, was bei uns in der Ausbildung so alles passiert. Aber meistens nur Projekte, die bereits abgeschlossen sind. Damit ich dem auch weiterhin nachkomme, hier ein bisschen, was war, ist und kommen wird.

Was war?

Ganz kurz gefasst? PowerShell. Und in letzter Zeit wird das Wort im NETWAYS und Icinga-Kontext ganz schön oft in den Raum geworfen. Letztes Jahr hat Christian irgendwann den Entschluss gefasst, das damalige Windows-Modul seinerseits zu einem voll funktionalen Framework mit PowerShell umzugestalten. Christian hatte, sowie alle der Kollegen, die Möglichkeit, einen Azubi mit ins Boot zu holen – und von hier sollte es keine große Überraschung sein, wo die Geschichte hinführt. Besagter Azubi war eben ich.

Ich hatte keinerlei Ahnung von PowerShell oder der Windows-Welt jenseits der Anwenderseite. Doch auch PowerShell ist kein Hexenwerk und die logischen Abhandlungen, die man bei anderen Sprachen verwenden kann, verlernt und verliert man auch hier nicht.

Juli 2019 hat das ganze begonnen, also zumindest für mich, und das Ziel sollte die OSMC im selbigen Jahr sein. Es ist einfach ein ganz anderer Ansporn zu wissen, dass man an einer Sache mitarbeitet, die später auf einer großen Plattform präsentiert wird und man sehen wird, was die eigene Arbeit gebracht hat.

Bis dato war ich eher an Plugin-Entwicklung sowie an den dazugehörigen Providern beteiligt. Auch das ein oder andere Tool im Framework kommt aus meiner Feder. Aber wenn man sieht, was Christian im vergangenen Jahr geleistet hat, dann kann man nur neidisch sein. Natürlich war seit meinem letzten Blog-Post nicht alles PowerShell. Ich hatte auch Trainings, habe die ersten Trainings als Co-Trainer mitgeleitet, war auf meiner ersten Consulting-Reise und noch mehr. Aber das PowerShell-Projekt lag mir besonders am Herzen.

Was ist?

Jetzt? Erstmal Foreman-Schulung. In der Vergangenheit wurde ich ja schon das ein oder andere Mal mit Foreman konfrontiert. Sei es ein bisschen Community-Arbeit beim Übersetzen von Strings oder mein letzter Blog-Post, in dem ich einen kleinen Einblick gegeben habe zum OSCAMP on Foreman, was letztes Jahr im Anschluss an die OSMC stattgefunden hat. Danach? Zunächst Abteilungsdurchlauf in den Support, auch wenn dieser nicht von langem ist, weil die Berufsschule dazwischen kommt und das auch noch samt Zwischenprüfung. Aber wird schon schief gehen.

Was wird?

Was? Ein ganzer Absatz ohne PowerShell. Also ja, ich mach auch weiter PowerShell. Man darf sich in der Hinsicht bald auch auf ein Zertifikats-Plugin freuen mit eigenem Provider. Und sonst? Die zweite gemeinsame Azubi-Projektwoche bahnt sich an, aber auch dazu werdet ihr bestimmt wieder einen Blog-Post bekommen. An dieser Stelle ist auch noch zu erwähnen, dass besagter Christian diesen Mittwoch sein erstes Webinar zu Icinga for Windows abgehalten hat. Keine Angst, die ganze Sache kommt auch später auf YouTube und zwei weitere Webinare stehen ja noch aus. Zum einen: Icinga for Windows – Custom Plugin Development am 01. April 2020 um 10:30 und Icinga for Windows – Custom Daemon Development am 06. Mai 2020 zur gleichen Zeit. Eine Übersicht zu den Webinaren bekommt ihr hier. Stellt euch drauf ein, dass in der Windows-Monitoring Landschaft noch so einiges passieren wird.

 

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.

Open Source Camp on Foreman

Like every year there was an Open Source Camp following the OSMC and as usual we helped organize that. Just in case you aren’t aware of what an Open Source Camp is here is the just of it: It’s meant to be an offer for Open Source projects to present themselves more in depth to the community. This year the Open Source Camp is on that one special yellow helmet we all know and love, Foreman.

Ondřej Ezr started us off with Ansible automation for Foreman (hosts). There are probably more than enough people using puppet only in their Foreman environment. Alternative or complementary to that would be using the plugin foreman_ansible. Ansible and Puppet don’t necessarily need to be better or worse, they are different and both have their advantages and disadvantages. By going through some basic steps, like role assignment, host creation and so on, he showed how one can do all that, but with Ansible. You can easily dynamically allocate roles and installations through Ansible to your Foreman hosts, but to make it even more specific one can set custom variables within the Ansible plugin for it to use, like foreman_repository_version. You could invoke a Job, like an Ansible Playbook, which will overwrite the variables previously set or make your installation more customizable from the get go. Install from git, run a playbook through ssh and more was covered during his talk. The plugin would not be a good alternative or viable if it did not hold up against the standards that puppet sets as a competitor. While Ansible doesn’t offer an inherit solution for reoccurring runs like every hour, the plugin does.

Next up was Bernhard Suttner, who wanted to give us a taste of Salted Foreman. Initially he explained what all that salt was about. The SaltStack a open source project written in python, can be used as a configuration management tool for Foreman. Salt excels at orchestrating cloud environments and network use-cases, but then we got to the Foreman relation. Running a salt and Foreman environment means running a environment of managed hosts, which are salt minions and a foreman_smart_proxy, which will also be the salt master. He showed us what salt in Foreman looks like and gave us some insight on how it works, but even more important from now on there are people dedicated to the project and some day the plugin might be as good as the puppet or ansible plugin. Salt is great and especially effective in terms of scalability. It’s pretty straightforward to use and the initial setup is not so hard. We are excited for what is to come.

Provisioning on Azure Cloud through Foreman by Aditi Puntambekar was going to follow that one. Aditi made sure everyone is familiar with the extend of Foremans capabilities in terms of provisioning. This was especially important because Foremans capabilities differ from its usual when it comes to cloud provisioning. After a quick trip through the configuration of compute resources and imaged-based provisioning templates we went onward to the Azure Resource Manager. She explained how the Azure Resource Manager essentially worked, but what is interesting to us is the foreman_azure_rm. Well and foreman_azure_rm does what you expect it to do. It adds the Microsoft Azure Resource Manager as a compute resource for the foreman. In her demo, she showed us how to use said resource and more.

Martin Bačovský talked about CLI tools with Foreman. He started of with the Foreman API. Of course the Foreman API is fast and has a wide range of tools and libs included within it. Just like Martin said in his talk, if you are interested in the Foreman API check out the documentation, it’s very good. Also interesting in the realm of APIs was his next tool, which is using apipie/apipy, which you are probably aware of if you are more heavy on the python side of things. Up there with the most well-known tools is Martins next, Hammer CLI, a command-line tool for Foreman. After sharing his experience with these rather popular tools with everyone he introduced us to Foreman’s integration of GraphQL. It’s basically a query language, which seems to be promising so far. Martin especially focused on the flexibility of queries and the introspective it has, yet one has to see where the project goes. There were many more tools he told us a lot about. To name just a few more of them, Report Templates, Foreman Ansible Modules and foreman_maintain. If you are interested in one of these tools in particular check out the video of the talk, which will be available soon on our Youtube Channel.

 

Give your Foreman a greater toolbox with Plugins by our very own Dirk Götz. Like he said himself: I will start of with existing toolbox things and at the end I will show you how to create these things yourself. And that he did. This talk was very demo heavy, thereby everything he explained was plain and simple, because you where able to see it as he did it. At the very top of his agenda was Job Invocation/Remote Execution. Not that exciting you think? Well, more interesting is the best practice advice he threw in on the way, like there is no issue of the configured user because his password is not saved as plain text in the database. Then the development part was up. He showed a couple of jobs that he wrote himself. Easiest, which served as an example is a simple ping check. He pointed out important thoughts to keep in mind, while writing jobs, like default values. Before his talk came to a close he talked a bit about the Web Console which has been introduced and is yet not well known. The web console is pretty much a integration of Cockpit. A well experienced user in the Linux world won’t be that excited about this, but a less experienced user will love this.

The next talk would not have happened, if Dirk didn’t spontaneously offer to step in. So we got another thirty minutes of Dirk Götz and I won’t complain. Katello: Adding content management to Foreman was the title and people where keen to hear about just that. What is Katello? Dirk described it as a defined set of Foreman plugins but not just that. It enriches your content management, as well as subscription management. Wait… content management? Why do I need that? Configuration management should be enough! Not necessarily, depending on your environment. Lets just pick up the points that Dirk made towards content management. For local content it ensures availability. For staging, it allows testing updates and makes builds reproducible. So content management should be seen as an addition to config management. He also talks about content views and how they are used to do the versioning, while they are being held by life cycles. Integration in orchestration was also a rather big point during his talk, which is done via SSH or Ansible. Dirk designs his talk in a way that makes summarizing them impossible, because he covers way to much. Lets just say not announced but very appreciated and most definitely worth checking out at our NETWAYS-Youtube Channel.

It was my second Open Source Camp and if you ask me this kind of exchange is what one wants to see in the open source community. There was variety and judging by the crowd reactions I was not the only one enjoying these talks. Thanks to all the speakers and attendees, safe travels home to everyone. Until the next Open Source Camp, hope to see you there!

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.

Milano – PostgreSQL Conference Europe 2019

It has been a while since one of us visited a PostgreSQL Conference. So when the opportunity arose Lennart and I took it. Additionally, it is somewhat of a special pgconf this year, because the conference is held where it originated, Italy. With over 500 attendees the conference set a new all time record. It is going to be a good one. Numerous talks, a lot of variety and gaining more insight into the postgres community. That being said, these talks can by no means be summarized in one blog post, that is why I have decided to bring you my just personal highlights. If you are interested in talks not mentioned here, I highly recommend checking out the official pgconf.eu website, where at least most slides of speakers can be found.

Paul Ramseys talk about PostGIS was the first one that spiked my attention. Having used PostGIS before without extensive knowledge, the add-on seemed pretty mundane, but little did I know. And I mean that. Little did I know of the extend of PostGIS or GIS as a whole. Let me try to give you the just of it. There was a phrase that he used a few times that somehow stuck: GIS without the GIS. To be just that PostGIS without the GIS the workload of low-performance scripts had to be moved to more efficient SQL. Additionally, spatial middleware from the database to the web had to go. Lastly, PostGIS had to be build in a way that provides developer with direct access to a GIS analytical engine. After giving everyone a basic introduction with the some example problems and queries to solve them. Well, he told us everything about PostGIS or atleast a lot. SFSQL, OSS, ISO, Indexing, Spatial Joins, the list is long. 189 Slides, If you will.

Next up in my little list of talks I really enjoyed was Wonderful SQL features your ORMs can use (or not) by Louise Grandjonc. She went through various ORMs (Object Relationship Mapper) during her talk like Django, SQLAlchemy, activerecord and Sequel and used them for a little project of hers. With scripts she aggregated Data regarding pop music lyrics and used this data as an example for various queries.

More Than a Query Language: SQL in the 21st Century was the title of the talk I want to tell you about next. Markus Winand talked a lot of history here. He looked at the very beginning and saw how SQL evolved and changed in many ways. A lot of empathisis was put on SQL having been bound to the idea of an relational data model for too long and that not necessarily beening the case today anymore. While jumping through the timeline of SQL development and explaining various features in the process he validated his claim.

I think it was a great event. I really liked the variety of topics and I hope even though I just mentioned a few, you got some insight into the event. PostgreSQL has an awesome community and having that conference as a platform to exchange experience, help and learn from eachother is just great

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.

NETWAYS stellt sich vor – Alexander Stoll

This entry is part 19 of 23 in the series NETWAYS stellt sich vor

Name: Alexander Stoll
Alter:
22
Position bei NETWAYS:
Junior Consultant

Ausbildung: Fachinformatiker, Richtung System-Integration
Bei NETWAYS seit: September 2018

 

 

 

Wie bist du zu NETWAYS gekommen und was genau gehört zu Deinem Aufgabenbereich?

Nun ja, ich habe mich bei NETWAYS beworben und wurde genommen. Was ich genau mache? Ein bisschen von allem. Neben Berufsschule und diversen Schulungen aus unserem Portfolio, eben die ein oder anderen Projekte, damit man herausfindet was einem liegt.

Das geht von Umzügen bis Elastic Search zur näheren Betrachtung von Tools, wie Landscape. Derzeit bau ich unter der Leitung von Christian zusammen mit Niko, einem Azubi-Kollegen aus der Entwicklung, das Icinga-Module für Windows neu. Es steht immer etwas anderes an, bis man ganz genau weiß was man machen möchte. Für jetzt kann ich sagen das ich Puppet ganz cool finde.

Was macht Dir an Deiner Arbeit am meisten Spaß?

Die Arbeit macht mir überhaupt Spaß, ohne irgendetwas Spezielles rauszupicken. Natürlich gibt es Tage, an denen man frustriert ist, wenn man etwas nicht auf die Reihe bekommt. Aber daran hat ja die Arbeit keine Schuld, sondern die Tagesverfassung.

Ansonsten genieße ich die Abwechslung, die mir geboten wird, noch sehr: Schulung, Berufsschule, Projekte. Später fällt die Berufsschule weg, aber dafür kommen Kundentermine hinzu und ich freu mich schon auf die Reisen, die damit einhergehen.

Welche größeren, besonders interessanten Projekte stehen künftig an?

In wenigen Wochen wird es Zeit für das jährliche Azubi-Projekt, bei dem alle Azubis gemeinsam ein Projekt ihrer Wahl umsetzen, darauf bin ich ganz schön gespannt.

(Anm.: Alexander hat die Fragen vor der Azubiprojektwoche beantwortet. Wie das Projekt gelaufen ist, erfahrt ihr hier.)

Was machst Du, wenn Du mal nicht bei NETWAYS bist?

  • Serien & Filme schauen
  • Online-Spiele spielen
  • Freunde treffen

Wie geht es in Zukunft bei Dir weiter?

Beruflich? Erstmal die Ausbildung zum Fachinformatiker fertig machen und weiter hab ich mir noch keine Gedanken gemacht. Ich sehe meine berufliche Zukunft auch bei NETWAYS. Und wer den Hashtag schon das ein oder andere Mal ausgecheckt hat, der weiß, dass das hier ein cooler Haufen ist, von dem man nicht weg will!

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.

Azubiprojektwoche 2019

Wie jedes Jahr findet bei NETWAYS eine Azubiprojektwoche statt. In dieser sollen alle Azubis abteilungsübergreifend ein Projekt umsetzen. Dieses Jahr waren wir zu neunt und wenn man der Resonanz der Kollegen glauben schenken darf, dann war das Projekt ein voller Erfolg.

Alles begann am Morgen mit einem Brainwriting bei dem auch ordentlich Ideen gesammelt worden sind. Wer weiß, vielleicht gibt es die ein oder andere in den nächsten Jahren ja noch zu sehen.


Die Entscheidung fiel dann auf ein Projekt das sich um einen 3D-Drucker herum entwickeln soll. Ziel der Projektwoche ist immerhin, sowohl Spaß zu haben, als auch mal etwas Anderes zu machen als man sonst machen würde. Dazu kommt noch, dass man bestenfalls etwas kreiert was für NETWAYS einen Nutzen hat und nicht nur das uns gegebene Budget restlos aufbraucht. Bestimmt wird eines Tages mit dem 3D-Drucker ein Ersatzteil für unsere Kaffee-Maschine gedruckt und bis dahin könnten damit Goodies für unsere Schulungen oder ähnliches gedruckt werden. Vorwand – Check

Damit war auch schonmal ein Aufgabenbereich geschaffen, ein Team das sich mit dem Drucker auseinandersetzt, der dazugehörigen Software und bestenfalls auch selbst einige Dinge modelliert. (Wir haben dazu Blender genutzt)

Natürlich wäre Hallo wir haben einen 3D-Drucker gekauft und uns zu neunt damit beschäftigt ein etwas einfacher Weg sich aus der Affäre zu ziehen, deswegen gab es gleichzeitig noch einen Teil mit persönlicheren Beweggründen für alle Nerds und die es werden wollen.

Ein Gaming-Table, also ein Tisch der für mitunter für Tabletop-Games genutzt werden kann, aber natürlich war auch hier der Zukunftsgedanke gegeben.
Das ein odere andere Meeting-Thema mag sich anbieten an solch einen Tisch zu führen. Außerdem ist es sehr angenehm, dass sich nicht ein jeder zu einer Leinwand oder einem Fernseher wenden muss und nicht in den leeren Raum gesprochen wird.

Dadurch wurde natürlich ein zweites Squad geboren, weil der Fernseher lässt sich nicht von alleine in die MDF-Platte, die Tischbeine schrauben sich nicht von Selbst an, die Stichsäge schneidet nicht von alleine und der Überzug kommt auch nicht von irgendwo.

Wir haben uns in jeden Fall nicht zu wenig vorgenommen für fünf Tage und das ganze hat auch nur so gut funktioniert, weil jeder an einem Strang gezogen hat und man sich gegenseitig geholfen hat. Unsere Arbeitsstruktur hat sichergestellt das jeder über den Stand des jeweils anderen Bescheid wusste und entsprechend helfen konnte wenn eine Gruppen hinter den Zeitplan fällt. Am letzten Tag, dann noch ein paar Mal gemeinsam Proben, damit die Triple-Moderation nicht in die Hose geht, kurz bevor die Präsentation ansteht und natürlich ging alles gut.

Ein paar von uns werden bis zum nächsten Azubiprojekt keine Azubis mehr sein, sondern ausgelernt, während Andere versuchen werden das diesjährige Projekt zu toppen. Wir freuen uns drauf.

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.

Der Abteilungsdurchlauf: In der Umzugswoche bei Sales

Beim letzten Mal hab ich im Zuge des Abteilungsdurchlaufes ein bisschen von unserer Event-Abteilung erzählt und auch ein paar Informationen zu Managed Services umrissen. Diese Woche liegt Sales im Fokus. Wie der ein oder andere vielleicht auch schon auf Twitter gelesen hat stand bei uns ein Umzug vor der Tür, aber dazu gleich mehr.

Der Start in die Woche

Als erstes wurde mir aufgetragen mich ein wenig mit unseren Artikeln auseinanderzusetzen. Im Zuge dessen wurde mir zunächst eine STARFACE Compact V3 gereicht, die wir zu Demo-Zwecken verwenden. Dadurch, dass die Dokumentation von STARFACE relativ übersichtlich ist und das System nicht allzu komplex, war meine kleine Spielwiese auch direkt aufgebaut. In dieser sollte ich lediglich kleinere Dinge zur Wartung der Systeme testen. Sinn davon ist es, das nötige Know-How für das vollständige Zurücksetzen von Rückläufer-Modellen zu besitzen.

Ähnlich erging es mir beim AKCP sensorProbe2+, einem LAN-fähigen Umweltmonitor. Hier sollte ich testen, ob einer der Sensoren defekt ist. Entgegen der Erwartungen der Rücksendung war der Sensor voll funktionstüchtig.

Während der Woche bei Sales habe ich auch einen Einblick darüber bekommen, wie viel unsere Mitarbeiter im Verkauf, denn alles über unsere Produkte und unser Portfolio wissen müssen. Als ich Fragen eines potentiellen Kundens zu einem Icinga-Projekt beantworten sollte, waren die Kollegen um einiges fitter als ich. Natürlich bin ich noch ziemlich am Anfang meiner Ausbildung, aber trotz alledem war die Thementiefe der anderen beeindruckend.

Der Umzug

Doch dann stand der Umzug vor der Tür und mir wurde die Ehre zuteil das Lager mit umzuziehen. Das erste Mal das ich bei NETWAYS gesehen habe, dass alle – oder zumindest viele – aktiv körperliche Arbeit verrichten. 🙂

Regale abbauen, Inhalte in Kisten packen und ins neue Büro bringen, dann erneut aufbauen. Die ganze Hardware, die spezifisch für den Sales-Bereich ist, Drucker, PC, Etikettendrucker, Barcode-Leser usw. genauso wieder aufbauen wie vorher. Natürlich haben wir im Zuge des Umzuges das Lager gleich neu strukturiert und zwar so, dass es einfach für uns wäre neue Produkte ins Sortiment aufzunehmen. Rechts ein Bild einer der Umzugsphasen des Lagers.

Was hat dir Sales gebracht?

Das war meine Woche bei Sales, vielleicht hab ich nicht so viel von Sales gesehen wie von anderen Abteilungen, aber der Sinn und Zweck wurde trotzdem erfüllt, weil ich jetzt weiß, wie sich der Verkauf in unser Gefüge voller Abhängigkeiten einbindet. Ich habe gelernt, wie viel Ahnung die Kollegen doch haben und in manchen Bereichen sind sie wahrscheinlich sogar noch aktueller, als manch anderer. Auch hier wurde mir wieder klar, wie wichtig die Kommunikation zwischen den Abteilungen ist. Die Kollegen die NETWAYS Web Services auf die Beine gestellt haben und warten, haben natürlich mehr Ahnung als der Verkauf von den Produkt und helfen somit bei individuellen Kundenfragen aus.

Wir werden sehen was als nächstes auf mich zukommt, mittlerweile ist ja schon Juni und bald heißt es zum neuen Büro auch wieder neue Gesichter kennenlernen, wenn ich ins zweite Lehrjahr komme und diejenigen im Ersten ähnliche Erfahrungen sammeln dürfen.

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.

Von Ausbildung und Grok Debuggern

Vor mittlerweile einigen Wochen hatte ich eine “Elastic Stack”- Schulung bei Daniel. Bei der in wenigen Tagen alle Bestandteile des Stacks erst oberflächlich und dann in Tiefe bearbeitet worden sind.

Elastic Stack ist ein Set von Tools, die zwar von der gleichen Firma entwickelt werden und entsprechend gut aufeinander abgestimmt sind, jedoch auch einzeln ihre Anwendungsmöglichkeit finden können. Dieser besteht aus:

  • Kibana – ein Web-UI zur Analyse der Logs in dem u. a. Dashboards mit benutzerdefinierten Grafiken angelegt werden können.
  • Elasticsearch – eine Suchmaschine beziehungsweise ein Suchindex.
  • Logstash – ein Tool zum Verwalten von Events und Logs.
  • Beats – werden von Elastic als anwendungsfallspezifische Daten-Shipper beworben.

Übung macht den Meister

Damit die Themen aus der Schulungen gefestigt werden wird uns in der Regel direkt ein Projekt zu teil, welches sich mit den Schulungsthemen beschäftigt. Nach der “Fundamentals for Puppet”-Schulung vom Lennart wurde mir ein Icinga-Puppet-Projekt zugewiesen und zwar eine kleine Test-Umgebung für mich selbst mit Puppet aufzubauen. Genau das Gleiche war auch nach der “Elastic Stack”-Schulung der Fall, ein kleineres Projekt mit Icinga-Logs bei dem ich einfach ein bisschen mit Grok Filtern rumspielen sollte.

Spätestens da ist mir wieder bewusst geworden, dass die meisten unserer Consultants für sich irgendein Spezialgebiet gesetzt haben und das Dirk uns bewusst viel mit den Themen arbeiten lässt um festzustellen, was uns liegt und was uns Spaß macht. Bis jetzt habe ich weder etwas gegen Puppet noch Elastic und bis im Juli die “Advanced Puppet”-Schulung ansteht, hab ich auch noch ein weiteres Puppet-Projekt vor mir, aber dazu vielleicht beim nächsten Mal mehr.

I grok in fullness

Wenn wir schon mal beim Elastic Stack sind dann können wir gleich zu Grok Filtern in logstash kommen. I grok in fullness bedeutet übersetzt so viel wie Ich verstehe komplett. Zwar kann man das nicht immer guten Gewissens behaupten, aber immerhin versteht man jedes Mal ein bisschen mehr. Dieses Zitat ist auf der Seite des altbekannten Grok Debuggers zu finden.

An dieser Stelle ist es vielleicht ganz interessant den nun schon zwei Jahre alten Blog-Post von Tobi aufzugreifen. Seit schon geraumer Zeit ist auch in Kibana direkt ein Grok Debugger zu finden. Den Debugger kann man unter dem Reiter Dev Tools finden. Hier ein kleines Beispiel:

Der Grok Debugger in Kibana sieht nicht nur besser aus und ist einfacher zu erreichen. Er hat mir auch in der ein oder anderen Situation geholfen, da er auch das ein oder andere Pattern kennt, dass der alteingesessen Grok Debugger nicht kennt. Viel Spaß beim Grok Filter bauen!

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.

Der Abteilungsdurchlauf: Von Managed Services zum Eventmanagement

Gut vier Monate sind vergangen seitdem ich bei NETWAYS angefangen habe. Viel hat sich seitdem ereignet: Ein LAMP-Projekt, die Open Source Monitoring Conference, dann diverse interne Schulungen und ein paar eingestreute Berufsschulblöcke später finde ich mich zuerst bei Managed Services und dann bei Events wieder.

Wie war es bei Managed Services

Managed Services im Customer Hosting umfasst viele Themengebiete, die für mich als zukünftigen Consultant relevant sind. Die acht Wochen dort, waren zunächst vor allem eine Möglichkeit die anderen Kollegen kennenzulernen, aber auch eine Zeit, in der ich bei NETWAYS das erste Mal Verantwortung übernehmen durfte und für die Kunden direkt arbeiten konnte. Natürlich in einem abgesicherten Umfeld, da mir bei Fragen eine Reihe erfahrener Kollegen zur Seite stand.

Was hat dir Events gebracht?

Durch meine Zeit bei Events habe ich vielleicht noch ein bisschen mehr verstanden, wie die Zahnräder bei NETWAYS ineinandergreifen.

Wenn man so möchte, kann man Events unterteilen in  Training und Events (Konferenzen). Die Woche über habe ich mit Stefan ungefähr 80 % einer GitLab-Schulung vorbereitet. Ich habe die Handouts, Aufgaben, sowie Lösungen ausgedruckt, gestanzt, abgeheftet, eine Vielzahl an Laptops für die Schulung vorbereitet, Reservierungen und Bestellungen getroffen und so weiter.

Ich habe zum Beispiel auch Kontakt zu unserem Trainer für die Schulung aufgenommen und die Unterlagen für ihn vorbereitet. Eben dieser Trainer kann mit dem nötigen Know-How irgendwann ich sein und dann bin ich mir bereits über vieles im Klaren und kann so besser mit Stefan zusammenarbeiten.

Was ich sonst gelernt habe: Das Marketing braucht Input der anderen Abteilungen, um Produkte und Dienstleistungen möglichst konkret darstellen zu können und Events, wie die OSMC oder die bevorstehende OSDC, sind Veranstaltungen auf denen sich Leute austauschen können und bieten Experten eine Plattform, um ihr Wissen zu teilen. Eben diesen Experten, die mir helfen meinen Job besser zu machen.

 

Alexander Stoll
Alexander Stoll
Junior Consultant

Alexander ist ein Organisationstalent und außerdem seit Kurzem Azubi im Professional Services. Wenn er nicht bei NETWAYS ist, sieht sein Tagesablauf so aus: Montag, Dienstag, Mittwoch Sport - Donnerstag Pen and Paper und ein Wochenende ohne Pläne. Den Sportteil lässt er gern auch mal ausfallen.