Select Page

NETWAYS Blog

Ansible – Loop over multiple tasks

ansible logo

The last time I wrote about Ansible and the possibility to use blocks to group multiple tasks. Which you can read here. Sadly this feature does not work with loop, so there is no clean way to loop over multiple tasks in a play without writing the same loop statement at tasks over and over.

But when we come across the need of tasks which depend on each other, for example, we execute a script with a certain parameter and its result is necessary for the upcoming tasks.

Let’s go through a common example, creating a site consists of a few steps. Creating the directory, creating the vhost and then enabling the site.


- name: "create {{ site }} directory"
  file:
    ensure: directory
    dest: "/var/www/{{ site }}"
    
- name: "create {{ site }}"
  template:
    src: vhost.j2
    dest: "/etc/apache2/sites-available/{{ site }}"
  register: vhost

- name: "enable {{ site }}"
  command: /usr/sbin/a2ensite "{{ site }}"
  register: result
  when: vhost.changed
  changed_when: "'Enabling site' in result.stdout"
  notify: apache_reload

We could use a loop for each tasks and afterwards find the right result for the next task to depend on. But the styleguide will warn you if you try to use Jinja2 syntax in when statements.

So the best solution to this is to use include_tasks, which can include a file with tasks. This task is allowed to have a loop directive and so we can include it multiple times.
Lets see how this would apply to our scenario:


- set_fact:
    sites:
      - default
      - icingaweb2

- name: create vhosts
  include_tasks: create-vhosts.yml
  loop: "{{ sites }}"
  loop_control:
    loop_var: site


In the Result we can see clearly that all tasks are applied for each element in the sites variable.


TASK [set_fact] *********************************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK [create vhosts] ****************************************
included: /Users/twening/Documents/netways/ansible_test20/create-vhosts.yml for localhost => (item=default)
included: /Users/twening/Documents/netways/ansible_test20/create-vhosts.yml for localhost => (item=icingaweb2)

TASK [create default directory] *****************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK [create default] ***************************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK [enable default] ***************************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK [create icingaweb2 directory] **************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK [create icingaweb2] ************************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK [enable icingaweb2] ************************************
ok: [localhost]

PLAY RECAP **************************************************
localhost                  : ok=10   changed=0    unreachable=0    failed=0    skipped=0    rescued=0    ignored=0


Check out our Blog for more awesome posts and if you need help with Ansible send us a message or sign up for one of our trainings!

Thilo Wening
Thilo Wening
Consultant

Thilo hat bei NETWAYS mit der Ausbildung zum Fachinformatiker, Schwerpunkt Systemadministration begonnen und unterstützt nun nach erfolgreich bestandener Prüfung tatkräftig die Kollegen im Consulting. In seiner Freizeit ist er athletisch in der Senkrechten unterwegs und stählt seine Muskeln beim Bouldern. Als richtiger Profi macht er das natürlich am liebsten in der Natur und geht nur noch in Ausnahmefällen in die Kletterhalle.

Virtual Environments in Python

Viele Betriebssysteme liefern eine Python-Version mit, die sich aufgrund von weiteren Abhängigkeiten nicht so einfach wechseln oder entfernen lässt. Ein Beispiel dafür ist CentOS 7.7. Hier wird auch heute noch Python 2.7.5 standardmäßig mit ausgeliefert, aktuell ist 3.8.2. Mit Virtual Environments (Virtualenv) bietet Python ein Funktion, um trotzdem andere Versionen dort nutzen zu können und zwar dort, wo sie benötigt werden.

Die gewünschte Version muss natürlich trotzdem installiert werden, auf CentOS 7 geschieht das beispielsweise mit:

$ yum install python3

Anschließend wird das Virtual Environment initialisiert, dafür muss zuerst in ein Verzeichnis gewechselt werden, in dem zusätzliche Dateien abgelegt werden können (hier am Beispiel Graphite):

$ cd /opt/
$ python3 -m venv graphite

Danach wird das Virtual Environment aktiviert:

$ source graphite/bin/activate

Während man sich im Virtual Environment befindet, ändert sich der Bash-Prompt und sämtliche Python-Befehle werden auf die geänderte Python-Version angepasst:

(graphite)$ pip --version
(graphite)$ pip 9.0.3 from /opt/graphite/lib64/python3.6/site-packages (python 3.6)

Nun lassen sich die gewünschten Paketbhängigkeiten installieren oder Änderungen vornehmen. Und mit deactivate lässt sich das Virtual Environment wieder verlassen, bis es erneut aktiviert wird.

Wer trotzdem noch Unterstützung bei Linux oder vielleicht auch bei Graphite braucht, der kann sich natürlich gerne vertrauensvoll an uns wenden: clickhere

Markus Waldmüller
Markus Waldmüller
Lead Senior Consultant

Markus war bereits mehrere Jahre als Sysadmin in Neumarkt i.d.OPf. und Regensburg tätig. Nach Technikerschule und Selbständigkeit ist er nun Anfang 2013 bei NETWAYS als Lead Senior Consultant gelandet. Wenn er nicht gerade die Welt bereist, ist der sportbegeisterte Neumarkter mit an Sicherheit grenzender Wahrscheinlichkeit auf dem Mountainbike oder am Baggersee zu finden.

Ansible – should I use omit filter?

When we talk about Ansible, we more and more talk about AWX or Tower. This Tool comes in handy when you work with Ansible in a environment shared with colleagues or multiple teams.
In AWX we can reuse the playbooks we developed and share them with our colleagues on a GUI Platform.

Often we need a bit of understanding how a playbook is designed or if a variable need to be defined for the particular play. This can be much more tricky when sharing templates to people unaware of your work.

This is where the omit filter can be used. The easiest way to explain this, if the variable has no content or isn’t defined, omit the parameter.

The following example is an extract from the documentation:


- name: touch files with an optional mode
  file:
    dest: "{{ item.path }}"
    state: touch
    mode: "{{ item.mode | default(omit) }}"
  loop:
    - path: /tmp/foo
    - path: /tmp/bar
    - path: /tmp/baz
      mode: "0444"

In AWX we can create surveys, those are great to ask a few questions and provide a guide on how to use the underlying play. But often we need to choose between two variables whether one or another action should happen. Defined by the variable in use. If we leave one of both empty, Ansible will see those empty as defined but “None” (Python null) as content.

With the omit filter we can remove the parameter from the play, so if the parameter is empty it won’t be used.

The following code is the usage of icinga2_downtimes module which can create downtimes for hosts or hostgroups but the parameters cannot be used at the same time. In this case I can show the variable for hostnames and hostgroups in the webinterface. The user will use one variable and the other variable will be removed and therefore no errors occur.


- name: schedule downtimes
  icinga2_downtimes:
    host: https://icingaweb2.localdomain
    username: icinga_downtime
    password: "{{ icinga_downtime_password }}"
    hostnames: "{{ icinga2_downtimes_hostnames | default(omit) }}"
    hostgroups: "{{ icinga2_downtimes_hostgroups | default(omit) }}"
    all_services: "{{ icinga2_downtimes_allservices | default(False) }}"

The variables shown in the AWX GUI on the template.

This filter can be used in various other locations to provide optional parameters to your users.

If you want to learn more about Ansible, checkout our Ansible Trainings or read more on our blogpost.

Thilo Wening
Thilo Wening
Consultant

Thilo hat bei NETWAYS mit der Ausbildung zum Fachinformatiker, Schwerpunkt Systemadministration begonnen und unterstützt nun nach erfolgreich bestandener Prüfung tatkräftig die Kollegen im Consulting. In seiner Freizeit ist er athletisch in der Senkrechten unterwegs und stählt seine Muskeln beim Bouldern. Als richtiger Profi macht er das natürlich am liebsten in der Natur und geht nur noch in Ausnahmefällen in die Kletterhalle.

Managing your Ansible Environment with Galaxy

Ansible is known for its simplicity, lightweight footprint and flexibility to configure nearly any device in your infrastructure. Therefore it’s used in large scale environments shared between teams or departments. This leads to even bigger Ansible environments which need to be tracked or managed in version control systems like Git.

Mostly environments grow with their usage over time, in this case it can happen that all roles are managed inside one big repository. Which will eventually lead to quite messy configuration and loss of knowledge if roles are tested or work the way they supposed to work.

Ansible provides a solution which is called Galaxy, it’s basically a command line tool which keeps your environment structured, lightweight and enforces your roles to be available in a specific version.

First of all you can use the tool to download and manage roles from the Ansible Galaxy which hosts many roles written by open-source enthusiasts. 🙂


# ansible-galaxy install geerlingguy.ntp -v
Using /Users/twening/ansible.cfg as config file
 - downloading role 'ntp', owned by geerlingguy
 - downloading role from https://github.com/geerlingguy/ansible-role-ntp/archive/1.6.4.tar.gz
 - extracting geerlingguy.ntp to /Users/twening/.ansible/roles/geerlingguy.ntp
 - geerlingguy.ntp (1.6.4) was installed successfully

# ansible-galaxy list
# /Users/twening/.ansible/roles
 - geerlingguy.apache, 3.1.0
 - geerlingguy.ntp, 1.6.4
 - geerlingguy.mysql, 2.9.5

Furthermore it can handle roles from your own Git based repository. Tags, branches and commit hashes can be used to ensure it’s installed in the right version.


ansible-galaxy install git+https://github.com/Icinga/ansible-icinga2.git,v0.2.0
 - extracting ansible-icinga2 to /Users/twening/.ansible/roles/ansible-icinga2
 - ansible-icinga2 (v0.2.0) was installed successfully

It’s pretty neat but how does this help us in large environments with hundreds of roles?

The galaxy command can read requirement files, which are passed with the “-r” flag. This requirements.yml file can be a replacement for roles in the roles path and includes all managed roles of the environment.


# vim requirements.yml
- src: https://github.com/Icinga/ansible-icinga2.git
  version: v0.2.0
  name: icinga2

- src: geerlingguy.mysql
  version: 2.9.5
  name: mysql

Then run ansible-galaxy with the “–role-file” parameter and let galaxy manage all your roles.


# ansible-galaxy install -r requirements.yml
 - icinga2 (v0.2.0) is already installed, skipping.
 - downloading role 'mysql', owned by geerlingguy
 - downloading role from https://github.com/geerlingguy/ansible-role-mysql/archive/2.9.5.tar.gz
 - extracting mysql to /Users/twening/.ansible/roles/mysql
 - mysql (2.9.5) was installed successfully

In case you work with Ansible AWX, you can easily replace all your roles with this file in the roles directory and AWX will download and manage your roles directory automatically.

A example project could look like this.


awx_project/
├── example_playbook.yml
├── group_vars
├── host_vars
├── hosts
└── roles
    └── requirements.yml

In summary, in large environments try to keep your code and configuration data separated, try to maintain your roles in their own repository to avoid conflicts at the main project.

Check out our Blog for more awesome posts and if you need help with Ansible send us a message or sign up for one of our trainings!

Thilo Wening
Thilo Wening
Consultant

Thilo hat bei NETWAYS mit der Ausbildung zum Fachinformatiker, Schwerpunkt Systemadministration begonnen und unterstützt nun nach erfolgreich bestandener Prüfung tatkräftig die Kollegen im Consulting. In seiner Freizeit ist er athletisch in der Senkrechten unterwegs und stählt seine Muskeln beim Bouldern. Als richtiger Profi macht er das natürlich am liebsten in der Natur und geht nur noch in Ausnahmefällen in die Kletterhalle.

Graphite-API für Grafana und Icinga Web 2

Ziel dieses Posts ist es, am Ende die Metriken über die Graphite-API als Backend für Grafana und das Icinga-Web-2-Module graphite betreiben zu können.

Grafana übernimmt hierbei optional die Visualisierung über eigene Dashboards, was ansonsten Graphite-Web leistet. Für Icinga Web 2 ist Grafana nur erforderlich, falls nicht das Module graphite zum Einsatz kommen soll, sondern stattdessen grafana zur Darstellung im Icinga Web 2 verwendet werden sollte.

Die Graphite-API ist in Python implementiert und soll hierbei via HTTPS angesprochen werden. Zusätzlich ist der Zugriff via Basis-Authentifizierung zu beschränken. Dies alles überlassen wir dem Apache, auch die API lassen wir mittels WSGI im Apache laufen.

Der Vorteil gegenüber dem Graphite-Web liegt darin, die ganzen Django-Bibliotheken nicht zu benötigen und auch kein DB-Backend a la SQLite, MySQL oder PostgreSQL. Nachteil ist, das Projekt Graphite-API wird nicht vom Graphite-Team betrieben, somit ist die Pflege und Aktualität nicht sichergestellt.
read more…

Lennart Betz
Lennart Betz
Senior Consultant

Der diplomierte Mathematiker arbeitet bei NETWAYS im Bereich Consulting und bereichert seine Kunden mit seinem Wissen zu Icinga, Nagios und anderen Open Source Administrationstools. Im Büro erleuchtet Lennart seine Kollegen mit fundierten geschichtlichen Vorträgen die seinesgleichen suchen.

Veranstaltungen

Tue 27

Elastic Stack Training | Online

April 27 @ 09:00 - April 29 @ 17:00
Tue 27

Graylog Training | Online

April 27 @ 09:00 - April 28 @ 17:00
May 04

GitLab Fundamentals Training | Online

May 4 @ 09:00 - May 5 @ 17:00
May 04

InfluxDB & Grafana | Online

May 4 @ 09:00 - May 5 @ 17:00
May 18

Icinga 2 Fundamentals Training | Online

May 18 @ 09:00 - May 21 @ 17:00