New Request Tracker Extensions: Search Result Highlights, Quick Assign & User Overview

We use Request Tracker on a daily basis, and have written many extensions for our own workflows and visualizations. Lately we’ve been helping a customer to migrate from OTRS to RT running in NWS, and learned about new ways to improve our workflows.
 

Highlight Search Results on Conditions

When you own a ticket, but someone else updated the ticket with a comment/reply, you want to immediately see this. Our extension makes this possible with either a background color or an additional icon (or both).
You can also limit this to replies/comments from customers, where the last update wasn’t performed by users in a specific group. This allows to immediately see support or sales tickets which need to be worked on in the dashboards.
Another use case is to highlight search result rows when a custom field matches a specified value. If you’re setting tickets for example, you can visually see the difference between a “bought ticket” and “paid ticket” state.
While developing the extension, I’ve also fixed an upstream RT bug which has been merged for future releases. There’s even more possibilities, as we’ve recognised that one of the BestPractical/RT developers forked our extension already 🙂

 

Quick Assign People to Tickets

By default, one needs to edit the “People” tab to assign a ticket to a privileged user, or modify adminCC and the requestor. This takes far too long and as such, our own NETWAYS extension improved this with drop-downs and action buttons. We have now open-sourced this feature set into a new extension on GitHub: rt-extension-quickassign.

 

Show Ticket Count per User and Status

This extension was released a while ago, and we’ve fixed a bug with empty sets in there. In addition to that, we’ve added a new configuration option which allows to list specific groups and their members, and not only privileged users. This comes in handy to only show the NETWAYS members but not any root or meta accounts. Read more on GitHub.
 
Do you need more customizations for Request Tracker, or want to run RT in a managed cloud environment? Just get in touch 🙂

Michael Friedrich
Michael Friedrich
Senior Developer

Michael ist seit vielen Jahren Icinga-Entwickler und hat sich Ende 2012 in das Abenteuer NETWAYS gewagt. Ein Umzug von Wien nach Nürnberg mit der Vorliebe, österreichische Köstlichkeiten zu importieren - so mancher Kollege verzweifelt an den süchtig machenden Dragee-Keksi und der Linzer Torte. Oder schlicht am österreichischen Dialekt der gerne mit Thomas im Büro intensiviert wird ("Jo eh."). Wenn sich Michael mal nicht in der Community helfend meldet, arbeitet er am nächsten LEGO-Projekt oder geniesst...

Icinga 2 – Monitoring automatisiert mit Puppet Teil 11: Profile Part III

This entry is part 11 of 14 in the series Icinga 2 Monitoring automatisiert mit Puppet

Die heutige Fortsetzung dieser Serie befasst sich mit dem Management einer PHP-Umgebung für daen Betrieb eines Icinga Web 2 auf dem Icinga-Server. Icinga Web 2 benötigt in aktuellen Versionen mindestens ein PHP in der Version 5.6, kommen dann noch Module hinzu, wird damit einhergehend ein PHP 7 oder neuer vorausgesetzt.
Server mit Debian Stretch bekommen ein aktuelles PHP aus ihren eigenen Repositories, bei RedHat 7 muss auf das SCL (Softwarer Collection Linux) Repository zurückgegriffen werden.

class profile::icinga2::server(
  ...
) {
  case $::osfamily {
    'redhat': {
      require ::profile::repo::epel
      require ::profile::repo::icinga
      require ::profile::repo::scl
      $manage_package = false
      $manage_repo    = false
      $php_globals    = {
        php_version => 'rh-php71',
        rhscl_mode  => 'rhscl',
      }
      $php_extensions = { mbstring => {}, json => {}, ldap => {}, gd => {}, xml => {}, intl => {}, mysqlnd => {}, pgsql => {}, },
      ...
    }
    'debian': {
      $manage_package = true
      $manage_repo    = true
      $php_globals    = {}
      $php_extensions = { mbstring => {}, json => {}, ldap => {}, gd => {}, xml => {}, intl => {}, mysql => {}, pgsql => {}, },
      ...
    }
    default: {
      fail("'Your operatingsystem ${::operatingsystem} is not supported.'")
    }
  }
  ...

PHP selbst lässt sich mit dem Puppet-Module puppet/php des Projektes Vox Pubuli konfigurieren. Hierbei werden über die Klasse php::globals Einstellungen getätigt, welches PHP, aus welchen Quellen benutzt werden soll. Im Anschluss wir über die Hauptklasse php das Management auf das Betreiben eines FPM (FastCGI Process Manager) eingeschränkt. Dieser lauscht standardmäßig auf TCP-Port 9000 ausschließlich auf localhost.
Neben einem erhöhen des Speicherlimits und dem Setzen der Zeitzone, werden auch die von Icinga Web vorausgesetzten PHP-Extensions aktiviert.

...
#
# PHP
#
class { '::php::globals':
  * => $php_globals,
}
class { '::php':
  ensure        => installed,
  manage_repos  => false,
  apache_config => false,
  fpm           => true,
  extensions    => $php_extensions,
  settings      => {
    'PHP/memory_limit'   => '128M',
    'Date/date.timezone' => 'Europe/Berlin',
  },
  dev           => false,
  composer      => false,
  pear          => false,
  phpunit       => false,
  require       => Class['::php::globals'],
}

Bei der Klasse profile::repo::scl beschränken wir uns im folgenden Beispiel auf CentOS basierte Systeme, wie es auf RHEL einzubinden ist muss aus der Installations-Dokumentation abgeleitet werden.

class profile::repo::scl {
  case $::operatingsystem {
    'centos': {
      package { 'centos-release-scl':
        ensure => installed,
      }
    } # CentOS
    default: {
      fail("'Your plattform ${::operatingsystem} is not supported.'")
    }
  } # case
}
Lennart Betz
Lennart Betz
Senior Consultant

Der diplomierte Mathematiker arbeitet bei NETWAYS im Bereich Consulting und bereichert seine Kunden mit seinem Wissen zu Icinga, Nagios und anderen Open Source Administrationstools. Im Büro erleuchtet Lennart seine Kollegen mit fundierten geschichtlichen Vorträgen die seinesgleichen suchen.

Tracing PHP memory usage with Xdebug


In addition to Xdebug’s great profiling and debugging features it also supports tracing memory usage. This helps to find functions which consume a lot of memory or to identify memory leaks. The following options enable tracing right away:

xdebug.auto_trace=1
xdebug.trace_format=1

Traces are written to /tmp by default. You may change this via the xdebug.trace_output_dir setting. With xdebug.trace_format=1 you tell Xdebug to write traces in an easy-to-parse tab separated format. The logged information includes the start and end times of function calls as well as the amount of used memory when entering and leaving the function. The last two numbers help to figure out which functions increase the memory usage a lot. Luckily you don’t have to interpret the traces yourself but use a script for that.
The script parses the trace files and aggregates the numbers by function name. It accepts a few different keys to sort the output: time-own, memory-own, time-inclusive, memory-inclusive and calls. You can also configure the number of elements to show:

php tracefile-analyser.php trace.662975268.xt memory-own 10
Showing the 10 most costly calls sorted by 'memory-own'.
                                                          Inclusive        Own
function                                          #calls  time     memory  time     memory
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Icinga\Application\ClassLoader->loadClass             90  0.9151  2638176  0.0814  1262312
Zend_Loader::loadFile                                 17  0.1496  1183528  0.0345   882928
PDOStatement->execute                                 22  0.0102   395368  0.0102   395368
require                                               85  0.6066  1548112  0.0157   338512
require_once                                          22  0.0506   566296  0.0107   149128
Icinga\Application\ClassLoader->requireZendAutoloader  1  0.0045   154360  0.0023   120136
Composer\Autoload\includeFile                          8  0.0148    86544  0.0028    59448
Zend_Db_Select->_join                                 41  0.2599    59368  0.0627    57072
explode                                              135  0.0341    55672  0.0341    55672
Icinga\Application\Benchmark::measure                 94  0.2099    47448  0.0737    47352
Eric Lippmann
Eric Lippmann
Lead Senior Developer

Eric kam während seines ersten Lehrjahres zu NETWAYS und hat seine Ausbildung bereits 2011 sehr erfolgreich abgeschlossen. Seit Beginn arbeitet er in der Softwareentwicklung und dort an den unterschiedlichen NETWAYS Open Source Lösungen, insbesondere inGraph und im Icinga Team an Icinga Web. Darüber hinaus zeichnet er sich für viele Kundenentwicklungen in der Finanz- und Automobilbranche verantwortlich.

Monthly Snap November


 
Remember one month ago? The first talks were about to start soon, you had your first coffee, enjoyed the rich Holiday Inn breakfast, took your journal, in which you had your plan for the day scetched, you were happy to meet an old friend in the hallway on your way to Saal Jacobi, where Bernd Erk was preparing to kick-off OSMC. …
OSMC – good times! Take some of its spirit with you into the cold and dark december days and let it warm your heart like a cup of hot Christkindlesmarkt mullet wine.

Form OSMC to Open Infrastructure

How? Make yourself a cup of hot wine and read through OSMC 2018 – Day 1 and OSMC 2018 – Day 2 by Dirk, or OSMC 2018 – or: The Thirteen-Star Conference, in which our attendees share their experiences. Read Michi’s Hackathon stories and Dirk’s report about OSCAMP on Puppet. You’re more of a visual type?  Browse through our OSMC Archive and find all the videos, pics and slides.
Right after OSMC our NWS-Team hit the road to Berlin for OpenStack Summit. Check out their managed Open Infrastructure service at nws.netways.de – now with MyEngineer support!

Icinga Seminar & Berlin Camp

Lennart Betz continues his blogpost-seminar Icinga 2 – Monitoring automatisiert mit Puppet Teil 9: Profile and Teil 10: Profile Part II. Join the Icinga community in 2019: Icinga Camp Berlin: Call for Papers is running until Decemeber 31! Find all November Icinga updates here.

For the tech hearts

Achim tell you to Get your RadosGW metrics into Ceilometer. Loei explains the use and functionality of RFID & NFC. Niko shares Neuheiten beim IntelliJ-Update. Tim knows Ceph Mimic | Using loop devices as OSD
In git gud! Henrik tells the story of: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love my Code. Noah introduces you with GitKraken to a nearly perfect Git-Client, while Johannes shares another useful tool: PDF manipulieren mit pdftk.

Presents

In November Silke announced Black Friday mal ganz in Orange – Es darf gespart werden und Die neue Generation der SMSEagle NXS-97xx Linie stellt sich vor. It‘s always a good idea to check our Shop for special offers. Especially if you are looking for Christmas presents. In that sense: Entschleunigung vom Weihnachtsstress bei Netways!
Have a wonderful December and Christmas season! Stay tuned!

Julia Hornung
Julia Hornung
Marketing Manager

Julia ist seit Juni 2018 Mitglied der NETWAYS Family. Vor ihrer Zeit in unserem Marketing Team hat sie als Journalistin und in der freien Theaterszene gearbeitet. Ihre Leidenschaft gilt gutem Storytelling, klarer Sprache und ausgefeilten Texten. Privat widmet sie sich dem Klettern und ihrer Ausbildung zur Yogalehrerin.

Neuheiten beim IntelliJ-Update

Ob Java12, Kotlin 1.3 oder Neuerungen für Git oder Editor-Features wie mehrzeilige To-do-Kommentare. Das alles erwartet einen in dem neuen großen Update der Entwicklungsumgebung: IntelliJ Idea.

Die Publisher von Jetbrains haben mit der neuesten Version 2018.3 das nächste große Update von Intellji Idea eingeleitet. Mit der Erneuerung kommen neben der Unterstützung von Programmiersprachenversionen noch viele andere Features, die folgende Inhalte liefern.

Neue Features für Java 12 und Kotlin 1.3

IntelliJ unterstützt jetzt das Preview-Feature für die Raw-String-Literale. (Bild: Jetbrains)
(Prewiew-Feature für die Raw-String-Literale)
Intellij Idea beinhaltet zukünftig mit der Version 2018.3 die Unterstützung der kommenden Java-12-Features. Eine Vorschau für die neue Raw-String-Literale kommt mit der im März 2019 neu erscheinenden Version der Programmiersprache. Die neue Anpassung der Java-IDE unterstützt die Funktion bereits auch mit entsprechenden Quick-Fixes, sprich ein Stück Code der durch diese Fix-Funktion markiert wird und entsprechende Lösungen vorschlägt. Doppelter und somit redundanter Code kann ab sofort auch in komplizierten Situationen erkannt werden. Solche Duplikate sind dann im Diff-Viewer einsehbar.
Redundante Bedingungen werden jetzt noch besser erkannt. (Bild: Jetbrains)
(Redundante Bedingungen werden jetzt noch besser erkannt.)
Jetbrains hat einige weitere Quick-Fix-Optionen ergänzt um redundanten Code zu beheben. Unter anderem zählt dazu der überflüssige Sortieraufruf bei einer darauffolgenden Nutzung der Min-Funktion, bei der der Java-Stream-API genauso wie die Erkennung bei vorangegangenen überflüssigen Bedingungen, die bereits durch eine darauffolgende verknüpfte Bedingung abgedeckt ist. Zudem erkennt Intellij mit der neuen Version die redundante Verwendung von Annotations für unterdrückte Inspektionen.
IntelliJ bietet bei einigen Code-Stellen eine automatische Migration zum neuen Kotlin 1.3. (Screenshot: Jetbrains)
(IntelliJ bietet bei einigen Code-Stellen eine automatische Migration zum neuen Kotlin 1.3.)
Zu den Java-Neuerungen hinzu kommt auch noch die Unterstützung von Kotlin 1.3. Damit die Migration des Projekts zur neuen Version vereinfacht werden kann, greift Intellij einem unter die Arme. Zum Beispiel kann man Imports und Kotlin-Dependencies automatisch anpassen lassen. Ebenso gibt es auch für Kotlin Inspektions- und Quick-Fix-Optionen sowie eine verbesserte Unterstützung für Multiplattformprojekte.

Verbesserung der Editor-Funktionen und Git-Integration

Der Editor selbst hat auch einige neue Neuerungen mitgebracht, z.B mehrzeilige To-do-Kommentare(siehe Bild/GIF) oder dass in der Statusbar die verwendete Anzahl an Leerzeichen für Einrückungen angezeigt wird. Falls die Einrückung nicht mit der Projekteinstellung übereinstimmt, wird dies entsprechend markiert und eine Lösung vorgeschlagen. Zusätzlich kommt Ihr über das Pop-up direkt zu den Editor-Config-Dateien für die jetzt auch Syntax-Highlighting sowie Code-Vervollständigung unterstützt wird.

Auch mehrzeilige To-Do-Kommentare sind mit der aktuellen IntelliJ-Version kein Problem mehr. (Bild: Jetbrains)
Bei Git hat sich auch einiges geändert wie zum Beispiel, dass Intellij jetzt Github-Pull-Requests unterstützt und die Funktion „History up to Here“ die gesamte Historie aufzeigt. Auch nützlich dürfte die Funktion sein, die es erlaubt, eine Datei aus einem anderem Branch zu kopieren. Einfach ein Rechtsklick auf die ausgewählte Datei und schon gelangt man ins Compare-Branches-Fenster.(siehe Bild)
Mit wenigen Mausklicks kann jetzt eine Datei von einem anderen Branch kopiert werden. (Screenshot: Jetbrains)
Neben der überarbeiteten Funktion zum Durchsuchen des gesamten Projekts hat Jetbrains einige weitere kleinere Neuerungen zur Verfügung gestellt. Das betrifft Kubernetes, Javascript und Maven. Alle Neuerungen diesbezüglich findet Ihr auf der Internetseite von Jetbrains unter diesem Blog.

Niko Martini
Niko Martini
Junior Developer

Egal ob zu Hause oder bei NETWAYS, Niko hockt gern vor dem PC. Ab und zu fährt er auch mal mit seinem Dad auf eine Fahrradtour quer durch Deutschland. Nach seinen ersten Tagen bei uns, in denen er NETWAYS, die Kollegen und Tools näher kennengelernt hat, freut er sich besonders auf die kommenden Jahre.

Icinga 2 – Monitoring automatisiert mit Puppet Teil 9: Profile

This entry is part 9 of 14 in the series Icinga 2 Monitoring automatisiert mit Puppet

Es ist nun nahzu schon ein Jahr her, dass in dieser Blogserie ein Artikel erschien. Zeit diese Serie fortzusetzen, auch weil wir für diese Jahr noch den Release 2.0.0 des Moduls puppet-icinga2 planen. In den kommenden Artikeln möchte ich sukezessive eine Profil-Klasse entwickeln, die einen Icinga-2-Server inklusive Plugins, IDO, Api und Icinga Web 2 installiert und konfiguriert. Als weitere Anforderung soll dies erfolgreich auf RedHat- wie auch Debian-Systemen durchgeführt werden können. Getestet wurde der Code auf Debian-9 (stretch) und CentOS-7.
Als erstes Teilziel für diesen Artikel soll Icinga 2 nebst Plugins enthalten sein. Bei den Plugins soll auch berücksichtig sein, dass es Plugins wie check_icmp oder check_dhcp gibt, die erweiterte Berechtigungen benötigen. So dürfen ICMP-Pakete oder auch DHCP-Request auf Unix nur im Ring-0 erzeugt werden. Auf RedHat wird dies über das Setzen des setuid-Bits erreicht, unter Debian mittels Posix Capabilities. Damit stellt uns Debian nicht vor größere Herausforderungen, die Plugins für RedHat-Systeme erfordern jedoch, dass der Aufrufende Benutzer Mitglied der Gruppe nagios sein muss. Um dies Anforderung zu realisieren, muss der Benutzer icinga der Gruppe nagios hinzugefügt werden, dass bei Puppet heißt, er ist via User-Resource zu verwalten. Am besten überlässt man das Anlegen vom Benutzer icinga weiterhin dem Paket icinga2, damit werden solche Eigenschaften wie UID oder das Home-Verzeichnis dem Paketverantwortlichen überlassen, d.h. aber auch die Paketinstallation muss vor der User-Resource und die wiederum vor der Klasse icinga2 abgearbeitet werden. Der Service, der von der Klasse verwaltet wird, darf erst gestartet werden, wenn der Benutzer schon korrekt konfiguriert ist. Andernfalls würde Icinga als Prozess weiterhin unter einem Benutzer laufen, der zum Startzeitpunkt von seiner Zugehörigkeit zur Gruppe nagios noch nichts wusste.
Zusätzlich muss auch die Gruppe nagios vor der User-Resource vorhanden sein, was sichergestellt ist, wenn vorher das Paket nagios-plugins-all installiert ist.

class profile::icinga2::server {
  case $::osfamily {
    'redhat': {
      require ::profile::repo::epel
      require ::profile::repo::icinga
      $manage_package = false
      $manage_repo    = false
      package { [ 'nagios-plugins-all', 'icinga2' ]:
        ensure => installed,
        before => User['icinga'],
      }
      user { 'icinga':
        groups => [ 'nagios' ],
        before => Class['icinga2']
      }
    } # RedHat
    'debian': {
      $manage_package = true
      $manage_repo    = true
      package { 'monitoring-plugins':
        ensure => installed,
      }
    } # Debian
    default: {
      fail("'Your operatingsystem ${::operatingsystem} is not supported.'")
    }
  } # case
  class { '::icinga2':
    manage_package => $manage_package,
    manage_repo    => $manage_repo,
  }
}

Die Plugins befinden sich bei RedHat in einem zusätzlichen Repository, dem EPEL-Repository, das in der dedizierten Profilklasse profile::repo::epel verwaltet wird. Gleiches gilt für das Icinga-Repo mit der Klasse profile::repo::icinga, was auf RedHat für die gesonderte Paketinstalltion vorhanden sein muss und damit nicht, wie unter Debian, der Klasse icinga2 überlassen werden kann.

class profile::repo::epel {
  yumrepo { 'epel':
    descr => "Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux ${::operatingsystemmajrelease} - \$basearch",
    mirrorlist => "https://mirrors.fedoraproject.org/metalink?repo=epel-${::operatingsystemmajrelease}&arch=\$basearch",
    failovermethod => 'priority',
    enabled => '1',
    gpgcheck => '1',
    gpgkey => "http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/RPM-GPG-KEY-EPEL-${::operatingsystemmajrelease}",
  }
}
class profile::repo::icinga {
  yumrepo { 'ICINGA-release':
    descr => 'ICINGA (stable release for epel)',
    baseurl => 'http://packages.icinga.org/epel/$releasever/release/',
    failovermethod => 'priority',
    enabled => '1',
    gpgcheck => '1',
    gpgkey => 'http://packages.icinga.org/icinga.key',
  }
}
Lennart Betz
Lennart Betz
Senior Consultant

Der diplomierte Mathematiker arbeitet bei NETWAYS im Bereich Consulting und bereichert seine Kunden mit seinem Wissen zu Icinga, Nagios und anderen Open Source Administrationstools. Im Büro erleuchtet Lennart seine Kollegen mit fundierten geschichtlichen Vorträgen die seinesgleichen suchen.